Are American firms really more tax aggressive?

Are multinational groups headquartered in the United States more aggressive in their tax planning compared to non-US competitors?

That is, at least, a very popular strapline in tax circles. Negative media stories about the tax affairs of major US firms such as Apple, Amazon and Starbucks are often described as contributing factors to the OECD/G20 BEPS project and the European Commission state aid investigations. Although of course, by critics these projects are described as undue crusades against American firms.

Given the notorious difficulty in measuring effective tax rates of multinational enterprises (MNEs), there remains little systematic cross-national comparative research on the topic. Studies have varied in approach and results. For instance, economists utilising the prominent Devereux/Griffith methodology have often found relatively high effective tax rates in the United States. However, the D/G approach is based on a hypothetical domestic investment example and is not attentive to international tax arbitrage. Using financial accounts data, legal scholars Reuven Avi-Yonah og Yaron Lahav concluded in a 2011 piece that US MNEs had systematically lower effective tax rates than European MNEs. Another 2011 report from PwC found relatively high book effective tax rates in the US.

However, recent years’ academic literature has provided indications on the stand-out role of American corporate actors in the world of tax avoidance. A 2015 study by Chris Jones and Yama Temouri from Aston University found that US MNEs were more likely to locate investments in tax havens compared to firms headquartered in continental Europe.

Drawing from existing economic literature, Jones and Temouri identify firm characteristics likely to relate to aggressive tax behaviour (in this case, measured as tax haven investments), including technology intensity (R&D and intangibles) and incorporation in Liberal Market Economies (LMEs), such as the US and the UK – as opposed to Coordinated Market Economies (CMEs), such as Germany or Japan. Both of these hypothesis are confirmed by the analysis. They conclude:

“We find that MNEs from the high technology manufacturing and services sectors with high levels of intangible assets are more likely to have tax haven presence. (…)

MNEs from LMEs are significantly more likely to undertake tax haven FDI compared with MNEs from CMEs.”

On the other hand, an interesting new paper by Katarzyna Habu from the Oxford University Centre for Business Taxation, draws these conclusions into question. While Jones and Temouri’s paper draws on financial accounts data, Habu utilises a fascinating new dataset of corporate tax returns, made available by the UK HMRC to researchers. This provides a more accurate gauge of corporate tax bases, although it comes with its own limitations, such as limited cross-country comparability.

In short, the paper compares the taxable profit levels of similar domestic and multinational companies operating in the UK (based on industry and level of total assets).

Buried at the far end of Habu’s paper, a compelling read, is the following table:

Udklip

Here we see the differential (ATT) between the taxable profits to total assets ratio of the two groups (domestic and multinational) for various ‘home countries’ of the MNEs.

The results indicate that, from the pool of MNEs with subsidiaries trading in the UK, MNEs headquartered in tax havens are most tax aggressive, followed by French, Asian, other European, US and German MNEs. Entirely contrary to Jones and Temouri’s findings, there is no evidence here that US firms are more aggressive than German or Japanese firms. In fact, it rather indicates that French and Asian headquartered MNEs are more aggressive than US MNEs.

There are various potential explanations for the discrepancies in the recent literature.  Tax haven FDI and UK taxable profits avoidance are not necessarily expressions of the same type of tax aggressiveness. American companies could indeed be more aggressive in locating investment in tax havens, while at the same time not being more aggressive in lowering taxable profits through tax avoidance in the UK. More broadly, the wide variety of empirical data sources, theoretical approaches, geographical scope and so forth do not allow for easy comparisons between the studies. 

And then there’s the question of the differential between effective tax rates of domestic and international economic activity – one that is substantial in particular for US technology firms due to the tax system design (thanks Heather Self for that point). Existing studies do not investigate this systematically.

We should also note, as Alex Cobham importantly pointed out to me, that the latter study expresses net numbers – the overall effect of tax aggressiveness, which may hide significant flows of profit shifting in or out of the UK. US firms could conceivably be shifting profits into the UK in a tax aggressive manner without it showing up here. However, the evidence can’t say.

Thus, we should be careful in drawing firm conclusions from this ascending literature, but we should take both studies as interesting results that shed light on our understandings of the dynamics of MNE tax planning. There may be continuing suspicions that US MNEs are generally more tax aggressive, but further research is needed in order for us to firmly confirm or deny such assumptions.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: